All the technical details to build a successful website

If you don't find it here, ask us and we'll add it.

Making the conversion process less intrusive

Many site content providers have been told they need to make customer conversion a priority, but at what cost? For example, many people are annoyed when they go to a website for the first time and get a popup that prevents them from reading the content on the page. Instead of converting your potential customer, it’s a lot more likely they will be inclined to not return again due to the annoyance.

Should you use Twitter to promote your website?

Any self-described social media expert will tell you that you have to be on Twitter, but do you really? That’s something you should evaluate. Are your potential customers active on social media, and if they are, are you likely to to convert them via your social media marketing?

Increasing your font selection

Thanks to Janice M for reminding us that we don’t have to stay limited with the default fonts provided in WordPress. If you want have ~400 new fonts to select from, give Google Fonts a try. 

Stop comment spam with Akismet

If you’ve been using WordPress for some time, you’ve probably noticed comment spam — comments that sound really nice, but have really been setup to link back to their business when/if you accidentally approve the comment. The more popular your blog/website, the more you’ll likely receive. One of the best solutions for combating this is Akismet which is provided by Auttomatic, the same people who run WordPress.com. They have setup the service free for personal and non-business blogs. Once activated on your site, whenever someone comments on your site, it will send that comment to their servers to be reviewed. Because Akismet monitors millions of websites, their engines have a pretty good idea if that comment is likely spam or legitimate. If it shows up as spam, they’ll do the hard work and delete the comment for you, only leaving up to you to approve or trash the human entered comments.

What does your website look like with scripts blocked?

If you’re security savvy, or follow a privacy and security blog like PrivaSecTech, you know that the most popular way hackers get into systems these days is through scripts (flash or java usually). As such, there are plugins for most browsers now, like NoScripts for Firefox or NotScripts for Chrome which block all scripts by default, unless you manually authorize them. Using such a plugin in your broswer is arguably more effect than having anti-virus installed these days!